Project: Mounted Plant Plaque

Mounted plants are cool. There's really no way around it. When you mount plants onto a plank of wood and hang it up in your home like a prized piece of artwork, you become cool. It's as simple as that. So let's get started!

First, so that while your guests are admiring your plant art you can give them the nerdy plant science behind your success, let's talk a little bit about the best plants for this project. We recommend pothos, philodendron, orchids, staghorn ferns, tillandsia, moss or bromeliads as these plants are either epiphytic or adapted to growing on the trunks and branches of trees. Epiphytes are a group of plants that have adapted to gathering moisture and nutrients through other means than soil, many times the humidity in the air provides all the water the plant needs. The greek roots of epiphyte means 'upon plant'; their roots attach to tree bark (or in some cases buildings and other structures) and secure a higher perch to afford the plant more access to light in places like rainforests where the ground is all but shaded out. Now you know.

Supplies | Photo: Robynne Heymans

Supplies | Photo: Robynne Heymans

1. SUPPLIES

  • board to mount to - we used this one, complete with hanging hardware. You can forage for your own wood and using a picture hanging kit to attach hardware to the back.
  • Moss - we used sphagnum moss but you can also use live sheet moss
  • Floral Wireyou can also use twine or a colored jute
  • Plant - look for something in a 4" or 6" container
  • Nails & Hammer - If you use a solid plank of wood, you will need to add a ring of nails sticking out about a 1/4" around the base of where the plant will be to anchor the twine or wire to.
Moss bed | Photo: Robynne Heymans

Moss bed | Photo: Robynne Heymans

2. MOSS BED

Attach moss to plank under the area you want the plant to live. This will provide additional moisture and space for the roots to grow. Securely attach to the plank either through the slats or to the nails with the twine or wire.

Loosen root ball | Photo: Robynne Heymans

3. PREPARE THE PLANT

Remove the plant from the container and gently loosen the rootball and knock off some of the dirt so you have a sort of spherical ball that fits easily onto the plank. This lets the roots know its time to grow in a new direction and keeps the plant from being too mounded on the plant.

Place the plant | Photo: Robynne Heymans

Place the plant | Photo: Robynne Heymans

4. PLACE THE PLANT

This probably shouldn't be included as 'a step', but good job, you placed a plant on a plank.

Cover with moss | Photo: Robynne Heymans

Cover with moss | Photo: Robynne Heymans

5. COVER WITH MOSS

Cover all the soil with a generous layer of moss, getting in between the leaves. This layer of moss is what prevents the soil from spilling out onto your floor, so you'll want to do a good job with this.

Secure to plank | Photo: Robynne Heymans

Secure to plank | Photo: Robynne Heymans

6. WIRE TO PLANK

Starting in one corner use the twine or wire secure the mound of soil and moss to the plank. Go through the center of the mound in a criss-cross pattern, wrapping the wire or twine around the nails or wood slats at each turn. Finish by tying off discreetly and snipping off any excess twine or wire. 

Hang it up! | photo: Robynne Heymans

Hang it up! | photo: Robynne Heymans

7. HANG YOUR MASTERPIECE

Choose a spot with bright, indirect light (think bright sun filtered through sheer curtains). This plant art works well on its own as a center piece or as part of a gallery wall. To maintain: mist frequently (more often in dry months) to keep moss moist. About once a week put the entire plank in the sink and run under a light stream of water until completely heavy and saturated. Let dry in the sink leaning upright until it stops dripping (15-30 min) and re-hang. Pluck off any yellow or dried leaves as they occur. 

There you go! Now you're a brilliant plant artist and the envy of basically everyone you know. Don't forget to send a picture to your mom, she's going to be so impressed

We'd like to close-out January with this MUST SEE VIDEO on managing your indoor plant relationships. Good luck!